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Realty One Group
7975 N Hayden Rd
Suite A-101
Scottsdale, AZ
85258 US
 
Angela Vineyard Giarratano
Direct:(480) 282-1221
e-fax:(866) 552-1069
Direct E-mail:angela.vineyard@gmail.com
Realty One Group
7975 N Hayden Rd
Suite A-101
Scottsdale, AZ
85258 US

Chandler, AZ     

 


About Chandler

Chandler is a city in Maricopa County, Arizona, USA. Chandler is one of the major suburbs of Phoenix.
 
Chandler is an example of modern urban sprawl (its population boomed from a 1980 figure of 30,000 to a 2007 figure of over 240,000).
 
The city contains a large amount of modest tract home developments.
 
Computer chip manufacturer Intel has a major presence in Chandler with four locations within the city. Other technology firms also have operations within the city.
 
Chandler residents are represented by a mayor, a vice mayor and council members. The vice mayor is elected by the city council from among its members. The mayor, vice mayor and council members represent the entire city and are not elected from districts or wards.
 
 
 
 
 

Brief History

In 1891, Dr. Alexander John Chandler, the first veterinary surgeon in Arizona Territory, settled on a ranch south of Mesa, studying irrigation engineering.
 
By 1900, he had acquired 18,000 acres (73 km?) of land, and began drawing up plans for a townsite on what was then known as the Chandler Ranch.
 
The townsite office opened on May 17, 1912, the same year that Chandler High School was established.
 
By 1913, a town center had become established, featuring the luxurious Hotel San Marcos, the first golf resort in the state.
 
Chandler mostly sustained the Great Depression (a second San Marcos hotel was canceled due to the Depression however), but the cotton crash a few years later had a much deeper impact on the city's residents.
 
Later, the founding of Williams Air Force Base in 1941 led to a small surge in population, but Chandler still only held 3,800 people by 1950.
 
By 1980, it had grown to 30,000, and it has since paced the Phoenix metropolitan area's high rate of growth, with vast suburban residential areas swallowing former agricultural plots.
 
Some of this growth was fueled by the establishment of manufacturing plants for communications and computing firms such as Motorola and Intel, but despite the inclusion of many large businesses, Chandler is often considered a bedroom community for the greater Phoenix metropolitan area.

 

 

 

Geography

Chandler has reached its physical limits save for some remaining county islands and cannot expand outward anymore due to being bound in by the Gila River Indian Community, Tempe, Mesa, Gilbert, and Phoenix.

 
 
 
 
 

Economy

Chandler is noted for its annual Ostrich Festival.
 
Initially, agriculture was the primary business in Chandler, based on cotton, corn, and alfalfa.
 
During the 1910s, there were ostrich farms in the area, catering to the demand for plumes used in women's hats of the era. This demand ebbed with the increasing popularity of the automobile, but the legacy of the ostrich farms would be commemorated by the Ostrich Festival.
 
 
 
 
 

Attractions

Here are the best Chandler attractions.

 
The Chandler Center for the Arts, a 1500-seat regional performing arts venue, and the Arizona Railway Museum are both located downtown.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Recreation

World-class golf is only part of the action in Chandler.
 
 
Did you know that one of the country's highest-rated skate parks is located here?
 
 
How about year-round ice skating? Tennis, hiking, horseback riding, swimming - it's all possible in and around Chandler.
Infor from Visit Chandler.
 
 
 
 
 

Shopping

In 2001, a 1.3 million square-foot shopping mall, the Chandler Fashion Center, opened in Chandler.
 
This brand new regional mall coupled with the shopping areas of Casa Paloma, Chandler Pavilions and Historic Downtown offer a wide variety of options from one-of-a-kind shops to major retailers.
 
Chandler has created a shoppers' paradise that will please even the most discriminating tastes.
Info from Visit Chandler. 
 
 
 
 
 

Sports

For a list of all Sports Teams in Arizona click here.
 
 
 
 
 

Education

Elementary and Secondary
 
Most of Chandler is served by the Chandler Unified School District.
 
Chandler west of Loop 101 is served by the Kyrene Elementary School District and the Tempe Union High School District, and north of Warner Road by Mesa Public Schools. The San Vincente neighborhood in Chandler is served by Gilbert Public Schools.
 
The USD of Chandler is served by three public high schools: Chandler High School, Hamilton High School, and Basha High School, with Perry High School coming soon.
 
Education alternatives include charter, Christian schools, example, Valley Christian High School, parochial example, Seton High School, magnet schools, as well as "traditional" academies.

 

Post-secondary
 
The two-year Chandler-Gilbert Community College, serving 13,000 students, is located in the east of the city near the Gilbert border.
 
Private educational institituions Western International University and Apollo Group subsidiary University of Phoenix have locations here.
 
 
 

 

Transportation

Air
 
Chandler Municipal Airport is a two-runway general aviation facility located in the heart of the city south of Loop 202.
 
Memorial Airfield in the Gila River Indian Community may serve the city in the future.
 
The city is jockeying for membership in the Williams Gateway Airport Authority, several miles to the east, which as of 2007 only offers limited service to Chicago and Las Vegas, Nevada.
 
Most area residents continue to use Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport 20 miles (30 km) from downtown Chandler.
 
 
Public Transportation
 
Chandler has very limited bus service compared with other Valley Metro cities of similar size.
 
Most local routes dead end a few miles from the city or have further limited service within its borders.
 
Currently, two express bus routes leave from the city near downtown, and a new park and ride facility was recently completed further south.
 
Faced with increasing congestion, the land-locked city is pursuing transportation alternatives including enhancement of the local bus system.
 
No light rail lines have been approved in the city, although high-capacity corridors including light rail have been identified in other regional and local plans.
 
City officials joined the regional light rail authority, Valley Metro Rail, in 2007, expecting service perhaps in 2020. The initial route through the city will most likely be the Tempe South light rail line on Rural Road.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Information from Wikipedia